Posted by & filed under Business, Content - Highlights and Reviews, influence and persuasion, management.

By Lois Kelly and Carmen Medina, co-authors, Rebels at Work: A Handbook for Leading Change from Within

One of the great misperceptions about people who get labeled “rebels” at work is that they are simply young upstarts who are out to change everything. Our experience and our research say that’s not true. And as a manager, understanding your rebels’ true motivation is essential to benefitting from their enormous value.

Most rebels have a productive mindset; they tend to focus on the things that get in the way of achieving what matters and suggest better ways. They are not anarchists or people who want to reinvent every wheel.  Most rebels are much too practical to change what’s working well. Instead, they set their sights on what’s broken and aim to eliminate the organizational habits, bureaucratic rules, and widely accepted business practices that slow down progress without adding any value.
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Posted by & filed under Digital Publishing, html5, xslt.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) is a standards organization serving the “open web” — the set of freely available specifications that underpin most of the visible internet. In the years since the W3C was founded, all modern businesses have become “web” businesses, with their own industry-specific processes, jargon, and priorities. To that end, the W3C has formed interest groups for those industries which are adjacent to the web, with a goal to promote web technologies and ensure that the web is meeting common commercial needs.

I was co-chair for the Digital Publishing Interest Group for a time, and I have first-hand exposure to their work in interviewing publishers, documenting best practices, and writing recommendations for future specifications.

Screen shot of the first table of the DPUB specification review

One of those deliverables is an intimidating table of W3C specifications and standards that were considered relevant to digital publishing. There’s a lot to digest there, and it’s unlikely that any single human is deeply familiar with all of it. I’ve provided an opinionated gloss of the most relevant or active standards, and feel free to comment if I’ve disparaged or ignored your favorite specification.
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Posted by & filed under annotations, iOS, ipad, mobile, Native apps, news, Product Updates & Tips, Safari, Safari Queue.

Version 1.1 of Safari Queue is now available in the iTunes Store. We launched the app in late November, and we’re pleased to say that we’ve made a number of improvements in this first update.

What’s new in this version?

Version 1.1 of the Queue app includes the following new features and improvements:

  • Highlighting! Highlights sync with your Safari account.
  • Added a “Downloaded” filter to the main queue.
  • Improved night mode to better support notes, sidebars, tables, and so on.
  • Added support for video playback via AirPlay.
  • Updated video table of contents for improved legibility.
  • Added support for 180-degree rotation on iPad.
  • Cleaned up typography and and graphical elements on the main queue.
  • Refined chrome animations in the reading interface.
  • Fixed a bug where the queue would fail to load for a very small number of users (the “null” bug).
  • Added better support for pinch and zoom in PDF-based (non-reflowable) books.

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Business, communication, management, managing yourself, presentations.

By Jimmy Guterman

JimmyGuterman

Jimmy Guterman is editorial director of Collective Next and a curator of TEDxBoston. Previously, he served as a senior editor of Harvard Business Review.

Back when you were a beginning knowledge worker, chances are you distinguished yourself first by what you knew. You showed that you were passionate about the technologies relevant to your work by keeping up to date on the latest and greatest and sharing what you learned with your colleagues. This helped differentiate you and put you on a management track. But it all changes when you actually move into management. Once you’ve made that jump, your job is no longer show what you know; your job is to share and present what you and your team need to do. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Business, communication, Content - Highlights and Reviews, influence and persuasion, leading teams, management, managing yourself.

By Lauren Keller Johnson

Lauren Keller Johnson is a freelance writer living in Harvard, MA

You’ve decided you’re an introvert. Maybe you took the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test or read about the defining characteristics of introverts as compared with extroverts, and said, “Yep—that’s me.”

Regardless of how you arrived at your conclusion, you probably identify with the introvert communication preferences Patricia Weber describes in her book Communication Toolkit for Introverts:

  • Thinking things through before speaking
  • Openly talking about yourself with people you know and trust
  • Staying in the background in group gatherings
  • Communicating through writing
  • Conversing with others one-on-one rather than in groups or meetings

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Posted by & filed under Business, communication, Content - Highlights and Reviews, management.

By Jimmy Guterman

JimmyGuterman

Jimmy Guterman is editorial director of Collective Next and a curator of TEDxBoston. Previously, he served as a senior editor of Harvard Business Review.

In organizations, communication can go quickly awry when people shape the way they present the same information differently for different  audiences, so much that important elements get lost, obscured, or minimized. It happens more often you might think.

Imagine that your company has a project underway, and it’s not working out well. There’s plenty of blame to go around. Upper management didn’t define the project tightly enough. Those executing on management’s vision didn’t push back to make sure they knew what was expected of them. And it took you a while to figure out what was really going on. The project is now off track, running late. It can still be saved, but only if everyone is clear on what’s gone wrong and how to fix it. Without clear, direct, and consistent communication, you can’t solve the problem.
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Posted by & filed under Business, Content - Highlights and Reviews, delegating, management, managing yourself.

By Jimmy Guterman

JimmyGuterman

Jimmy Guterman is editorial director of Collective Next and a curator of TEDxBoston. Previously, he served as a senior editor of Harvard Business Review.

Perhaps the hardest part of becoming a manager is learning what and how not to do. It’s so very ironic: you became a manager because you’re good at what you do, but the skills that got you this cool new job aren’t the ones that are going to help you excel at it. To paraphrase the leadership guru Marshall Goldsmith: what got you here isn’t going to get you there.
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Posted by & filed under content, Product Updates & Tips, Safari, Safari News, Safari Queue.

Safari native apps

iOS: Safari Queue

Safari Queue

We’re looking to go from good to great on our iOS app, Safari Queue, by continuing active development to add the most-requested features. Thank you to everyone who has used, rated, and reviewed Queue, and look for continual updates in 2015.

Android: Safari Queue

Android users are encouraged to join our  Google+ group to follow development and get access to the early beta builds in January. Product Manager Bill Levien put together a preview video to show our progress to date. The Android app will definitely not be a lesser clone of the iOS Queue; this is a fully realized Android application that we think you’ll love.

Safari To Go

Though we’re focusing our mobile team on the Queue app series, we haven’t forgotten our users on Safari To Go. We’re planning some much-needed maintenance work on Safari To Go in the beginning of next year.
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Posted by & filed under Business, Content - Highlights and Reviews, innovation, management.

By Lauren Keller Johnson

Lauren Keller Johnson is a freelance writer living in Harvard, MA

To survive in an arena marked by constant change, your company has to innovate—create new offerings, as well as new business and operating models. To do that, people in every group, function, and team need to envision fresh, bold ideas that can be transformed into groundbreaking new products, services, and ways of getting things done.

That’s where you as a manager come in. As Lisa Bodell points out in her book Kill the Company, it’s your job as a manager to make your group a “zombie-free zone”—a place where people combat complacency by using their brains. Where innovation can thrive naturally. Where your people know that if they go out on a limb they have a safety net, so they’re not afraid to experiment. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Design Patterns, java, learning, Learning & Development, programming, Programming & Development, Tech.

Welcome to the conclusion of our seven-day Design Patterns Series. Today, we’ll conclude the series by learning the State pattern, reviewing the Strategy pattern, and pointing you to a number of other resources you can use to continue learning about Design Patterns. Open a free 10-day Safari trial account to access the series materials.

Did you know there’s an object-oriented way to implement state machines? More generally, sometimes objects can be in different “states” at different points in time — e.g., a file could be open or closed — and their behavior needs to change accordingly. Today, we’ll learn how to handle situations like this using the State pattern.

After that, we’ll look at the Strategy pattern. You already saw the Strategy pattern on Day 1 of this series, when you read chapter 1 of Head First Design Patterns. But now that you have a few more patterns under your belt, you might see it in a slightly different light.

Read more »